Kevin Bloody Wilson - Dilligaf (French translation)

French translation

Jnearab

Je suis le genre de mec qui aimerait croire que, si je pouvais remonter dans le temps
Banjo et Henry et même Ned Kelly seraient tous de bons potes à moi
Car ce sont des poivrots, poètes et hors-la-loi et moi, ça me connaît
et leur attitude aussi : en un mot : jnearab !
 
ça s'écrit j.n.e.a.r.a.b.
Jnearab !
Et ça veut dire...
 
Je n'en ai rien à branler: jnearab !
C'est assez direct comme ça ? Jnearab !
C'est juste une autre façon de dire « je m'en bats les couilles, mec ! »
Je n'en ai rien à branler : jnearab !
Je n'en ai rien à branler : jnearab !
 
Tu vois, c'est du déstressant facile, c'est simple et ça marche !
Dis « jnearab » la prochaine fois que t'as affaire à des enculés ou à des branleurs
Et quand tu sors, mets un jnearab sur ton t-shirt ou sur ta casquette,
Et quand un con te fait chier, tu lui dis « Mon pote, lis ça »
c'est marqué « j.n.e.a.r.a.b. »
 
Je n'en ai rien à branler : jnearab !
C'est assez direct comme ça ? Jnearab !
C'est juste une autre façon de dire « je m'en bats les couilles, mec ! »
Je n'en ai rien à branler : jnearab !
Je n'en ai rien à branler : jnearab !
 
Je n'en ai rien à branler : jnearab !
Je suis assez politiquement correct ? Jnearab !
C'est juste une autre façon de dire « Je m'en bats la race, mec ! »
Je n'en ai rien à branler : jnearab !
Je n'en ai rien à branler : jnearab !
 
Je n'en ai rien à branler : jnearab !
Hahahahahaha
 
~3oudicca
Submitted by 3oudicca on Wed, 14/02/2018 - 19:29
Author's comments:

Thanks to my husband for the wonderful word, JALADMEF.

English

Dilligaf

More translations of "Dilligaf"
French3oudicca
Kevin Bloody Wilson: Top 1
See also
Comments
petit élève    Thu, 15/02/2018 - 12:47

Regular smile

ils sont des soûlards -> "ce sont..." sounds more usual, and maybe "poivrots" or "sacs à vin" would be closer to the vulgar "piss pot".

"j'ai l'air de m'en foutre ?" rather means the contrary (do I look like I don't care?). You could say "j'ai pas l'air de m'en foutre?" but that sounds rather flat.
"T'as pas idée comme je m'en branle/tape..." would probably be closer to target.
"tapicjmeb/t" is still pronounceable and has the right number of syllables Regular smile

pointes au message -> "pointer" tends to be borrowed from English as a transitive verb ("tu lui pointes le message"), but that rather sounds like corporate waffle. The French meaning is quite different (punch a time card or lay down [a gun]). Rather "tu lui montres le message".

Je m'en bats la race -> that sounds like suburban yoofspeak ("race" originally meaning "face" in Arabic). Still it has become rather commonplace these last two decades, so it's perfectly good vulgar French Regular smile

3oudicca    Thu, 15/02/2018 - 12:43

Right, dear, I'm laughing because this was a joint effort with a native speaker, and only the first mistake is mine. Points 2, 3 and 4 were from my Frenchie husband, who has a Masters in Literature. Teeth smile So I'll correct them in secret.
For the record, I said the same thing as you about "j'ai l'air de mon foutre" *cough*. I'm not entirely sold on "tapicjmeb" - it doesn't quite roll off the tongue - so I'll try to find an alternative.
Corporate Frenglish... fair point. But this is what keeps our fridge full of food, so you can understand why our ears are desensitised to its offensiveness Wink smile
As for the "je m'en bats la race", my eldest kid's father is French-Algerian so I guess he taught me a few words. But it seems to be used often enough by middle-aged white people ... at least in my office Teeth smile
 

petit élève    Thu, 15/02/2018 - 13:02

I certainly don't have a Masters in Literature, but I was a case worker in the merry suburbs of Paris, so I collected a bit of yoofspeak there.
I also was a software engineer, so I had to endure quite a bit of corporate bullshit too.
I just found it funny to see both registers used in the same translation Regular smile

3oudicca    Thu, 15/02/2018 - 13:35

Regular smile This only proves that no literary qualification can help in translating the work of a fine poet like Kevin Bloody Wilson.
Software engineer? great Regular smile you know exactly the awful way people talk in this world.
For us, 'suburbs' calls to mind an image of a respectable area, inhabited by nice middle-class families. You can call banlieues "the hood" if you're talking in American English. This is informal, but fairly accurate. However, if you want to stick with The Queen's English, you'd probably say "rough areas/housing estates/parts of town". Or "big housing estates" could work too, perhaps a little more diplomatic.

petit élève    Thu, 15/02/2018 - 14:18

That's good to know. "banlieues" is synonymous with "social relegation" in France, but indeed town planning doesn't work the same way in the UK, and even less so in the US.